Check out the skilled, grueling work it takes to grow and harvest your Thanksgiving ingredients

Thanksgiving is all about the food, but few of us know much about the work that goes into getting that food to grocery store shelves. The work done on farms is physically grueling, often done in intense heat, but it’s not just that. Much of it is also highly skilled work despite the low wages usually involved.

This year, the United Farm Workers set out to change the very common ignorance with an epic, viral Twitter Q&A. Check out the work that goes into your Thanksgiving staples: onions, cranberries, Brussels sprouts, potatoes, and, while it’s not the most common Thanksgiving food, a pineapple harvesting video you have got to see.

Tell us your favorite Thanksgiving dish, and we’ll share some of what we know about the work behind the ingredients. #WeFeedYou #ThankAFarmworkerpic.twitter.com/QRPQUCMX1t

— United Farm Workers (@UFWupdates) November 22, 2020

Brussels sprouts grow on a very tough, woody stem— which means workers need both strength and precision to avoid chopping injury. Here’s a video.pic.twitter.com/im2H9TI0L3

— United Farm Workers (@UFWupdates) November 23, 2020

Carrots and celery both have juices that are “photoreactive” and can be dangerous to exposed skin when harvesting. You’ll notice here these workers are careful to cover their skin even though it was over 100 degrees. pic.twitter.com/3LuI9XqFwh

— United Farm Workers (@UFWupdates) November 23, 2020

This is an onion harvest in Indiana, which (like most states) does not have heat or shade requirements. Harvesting means 12 hour days. pic.twitter.com/FL7EA2T3hz

— United Farm Workers (@UFWupdates) November 24, 2020

Alvaro sent us this video from Merced County, CA. You’re right- it is not easy work. pic.twitter.com/q4Qi0pVlC4

— United Farm Workers (@UFWupdates) November 24, 2020

This wine grape worker Lorenzo earns $160 per ton of grapes picked for Napa region wines. Once grapes are picked they are hand cleaned for debris. (Looking for a union wine? Chateau Ste Michelle has a reputation for fair wages and taking worker safety seriously. @SteMichelle) pic.twitter.com/TPVn2IliOV

— United Farm Workers (@UFWupdates) November 23, 2020

Bet there’s celery in your stuffing. Celery juice causes a toxic skin reaction with sun exposure so even pre-covid the workers always cover their exposed skin while they work. pic.twitter.com/L1cwVucog3

— United Farm Workers (@UFWupdates) November 23, 2020

Source: dailykos